BISHOP NICK, GEORGE CAREY AND THE EUTHANASIA DEBATE

I always find Bishop Nick Baines clear-thinking and plain-speaking, often articulating questions I’m asking too.  And I like the way he poses questions and doesn’t just give answers.    This post of his on http://nickbaines.wordpress.com/2014/07/12/dying-matters/ is no exception.

‘The Church has got to face up to the reality of the world as it is lived.’

So, Lord Carey has changed his mind about assisted dying by polarising ‘compassion’ and ‘doctrine’, and stating that the church had to come to terms with ‘lived realities’.

Set aside the fact that Lord Carey continues to do what his predecessor never did – keeps on queering his successors’ pitch and seems unable to let go – and we can focus on the nub of his argument. Millions of words are being poured into the media today, so I will put a sideways perspective I haven’t seen pursued in the debate so far today.

  • Who decides what constitutes ‘compassion’? Especially when we know from many terminally ill people that they might well have urged assistance in their dying at an early point in their process, whilst moving on as they came to terms with their prognosis to a different conclusion. Who decides what constitutes compassion and at what point it should be recognised?
  • When did doctrine become emptied of compassion? Doctrine is simply doctrine. But, there is a principle here: law (which is what this is about) cannot be made on the basis of subjective judgements based on emotion; law requires a dispassionate clarity about the ‘doctrine’ upon which the legislation – and ensuing praxis – can be founded. There is actually no way of deciding on such legislation without having some ‘doctrine’ – assumed or articulated – that legitimises or demands such a judgement. In my language, it is the fundamental anthropology that shapes this: what is a human being, why does a human being matter, and why does it matter that these questions are admitted and addressed before moving to emotion/compassion? History is littered with examples of law being established without a clear articulation of the anthropology that underlies it.
  • Lord Carey says his mind was changed by the Nicklinson case.But, ‘Locked-in Syndrome’ is not a terminal illness and should not, therefore, be covered by the arguments he makes. Isn’t this what we call a category error?
  • What is a ‘lived reality’ and why is it cut adrift from considerations of thinking about why we matter? When did philosophy become the opposite of humanity and divorced from the rest of life? And, if Lord Carey is consistent, will he now support other ‘lived realities’ and, for example, back gay marriage, legalisation of drugs, abortion on demand, and so on – all describable as ‘lived realities’?

‘While medicine progresses at a remarkable pace, our statutory framework remains trapped in an outdated past, badly out of kilter with the real needs of our society.’

  • And to what else might that judgement apply? We clearly need a deeper debate and one that doesn’t assume that if you use judgement, you are, by definition, devoid of compassion.

Maybe the new “philosophical certainties” could do with being subjected to the “old” ones that have now “collapsed”?

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4 thoughts on “BISHOP NICK, GEORGE CAREY AND THE EUTHANASIA DEBATE

  1. I agree that this is a minefield, nothing is as straight forward as it seems, most of the cases are shades of grey. I’m glad I don’t have to make the decision to legalize this.xxx

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  2. Gilly, this a subject fraught with all sorts of difficulties and slippery banana skins. fronted up views, backwards views, sideways views, they do not matter, which said, the core subject and the person in it, does matter. So do a lot of other people in the circle. Who is to say that ‘objective’ others are best placed to make decisions. I am increasingly cynical about what objectivity really means and how it is manipulated. whether it be non-denominational, ecumenical or political,(though it beats me where those two truly part).

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