THE STAFFORDSHIRE HOARD

A few weeks ago Hub and I were wandering rather disconsolately in the city on our day off, not quite sure what to do with ourselves as the weather was wet and cold. We had been wanting to see the Hoard, but knew it was ‘on tour’ and what’s more, people were having to pay for their tickets.

So we were delighted to discover, when we looked to see what was on at the museum, to find that the Hoard had come to rest and what’s more, we could get in free.

It’s the largest hoard yet discovered of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork and it was found in a field near Lichfield by a guy called Terry Herbert, with a metal detector.   He must have thought all his Christmases had come at once.

It is wonderfully intricate and we marvelled at the tiny details. How did those guys do it, without the benefit of magnifiers? They can hardly be seen with the naked eye. Garnets were sliced into tiny pieces, then laid over gold leaf. Twisted wire threads were made of gold, so fine they look like hair. Extraordinary.

It was a wonderful pleasure to see it and admire it.

staffordshire+hoard[1]

http://www.staffordshirehoard.org.uk/

(image from http://www.historytoday.com/blog/editor/paul-lay/first-impressions-staffordshire-hoard )

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19 thoughts on “THE STAFFORDSHIRE HOARD

  1. Friends and former colleagues (Dr. and Mrs. Kevin Leahy) were responsible for cataloguing the hoard, and they were absolutely incandescent around the time the discovery was announced. Their discretion was so absolute until the announcement that we all thought it was the new grandchild that was so thrilling them, but it was the double joy of both the grandchild and the job of a lifetime.

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  2. I watched a programme about this on tv a while ago and it was fascinating, like you i wondered how they managed such intricate work with the limited tools they must have had. You are lucky to have seen the ‘find’ close up, glad you enjoyed it x

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    1. It’s very well-presented, with a magnifier placed over the top of one of the artefacts so that you can fully appreciate the amazing work. And so much of it! And also, rather mysterious – why are the jewels bent, but not smashed up? Something else we don’t know! Thanks for your comment.

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