SUNNY DAY OFF AMONGST TROGLODYTE HOUSES AND AN IRON AGE HILL FORT

Day off today – hurray – time to recover from the Archdeacon suddenly turning up without warning at the service yesterday 88| when yours truly was on duty with an all-age worship (see previous cartoon)

Phew. Thank goodness I’d had a team meeting and got organised XX(

Anyway – on our way out into the countryside we called in at a big furniture store which had been advertising its wares in a sale. You know the sort |-| – and sure enough, despite hundreds of sofas etc, there was hardly anything we liked, and nothing we could afford :no: We’re going to have to get something new when we retire. Does nobody do sofas with backs that are high enough to rest your head any more::: >:-(

Coffee at a favourite garden centre, then we went to see the rock houses at Kinver Edge. Have you ever seen them? They are quite remarkable. They really were proper houses in the 19th century, carved out of the red sandstone cliff. Apparently they were warm in winter and cool in summer. Each family had a parlour (where they did all the cooking etc) and a bedroom and some stores, and the community had the deepest well in England 8|. With plenty of water, and able to grow their own veg, the residents reckoned they were well off. People lived there until the 1950s!

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Then we walked up to Kinver Edge itself, where there’s an Iron Age hillfort. We do like a bit of history in our excursions, so we were well-chuffed. Beautiful sunny, cold day – and when we got to the top, we could see for miles. Fabulous. I love trees in winter – well, any time of year really – and on our way down a very tame robin flew down and turned his beady eye on me, and we looked at each other for a long time. Wonderful.

Decided not to go back to the garden centre for lunch, but to try in Kinver itself: not a good idea. We ended up in a pub where the food was very OK-ish … I think they heated everything in the microwave, which made the poppadoms and naan all chewy and meant that my lemon tart was warm round the edges and cold in the middle :-/

Never mind. By this time it was mid-afternoon and we decided to hightail it for home without venturing any further. Hub is working on his childhood coin collection: one of the many ‘archive’ jobs we have to do ahead of retirement, as we cannot take everything with us. He’s going to get it valued this week, although he doesn’t expect to get much for it.

Me? … I sat on the sofa with a crossword book, and DOZED OFF. Wow :zz:. This is my new party trick and it’s great!

For more on Kinver Edge you can go to the National Trust website here: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/kinver-edge/

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48 thoughts on “SUNNY DAY OFF AMONGST TROGLODYTE HOUSES AND AN IRON AGE HILL FORT

  1. Some of the old ice houses were built on a similar principle. I have seen Troglodyte villages in Spain, still very much alive and lived in. There were one or two in a dilapidated state. I wondered, when I saw them, if there was anyone today who would really want to take up the challenge to renovate one and live in it. Then again, there would not be much money about to renovate. My thoughts pondered on…….

    You can find deep backs on chairs, however, you may also find that they are at a low level and you would, perhaps, require to build up the seating to make it comfortable to rise from the seat. 1930’s suites were good for comfort, depth of back, low rise, and now hard to obtain. Some of today’s stuff is so deep, unless you have long legs, you’d be struggling to sit right back into the furniture, or get out of it!

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  2. Some of the old ice houses were built on a similar principle. I have seen Troglodyte villages in Spain, still very much alive and lived in. There were one or two in a dilapidated state. I wondered, when I saw them, if there was anyone today who would really want to take up the challenge to renovate one and live in it. Then again, there would not be much money about to renovate. My thoughts pondered on…….

    You can find deep backs on chairs, however, you may also find that they are at a low level and you would, perhaps, require to build up the seating to make it comfortable to rise from the seat. 1930’s suites were good for comfort, depth of back, low rise, and now hard to obtain. Some of today’s stuff is so deep, unless you have long legs, you’d be struggling to sit right back into the furniture, or get out of it!

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  3. So much history in your country, makes NZ seem so very young. Sure we have some Maori history, but they have only been here a few hundred years, since they came from east Polynesia .England can go back to pre-Bill the conqueror and the Romans a thousand years before. Really is a great old house.

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      1. Yes the maoris are not indigenous – immigrants like the rest of us. About 1300, is the estimate from Rarotonga and the Society Islands area. Our first people, perhaps? Certainly got the pick of the land and their land claims are perfectly justified.

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      2. I found your comment on Shimon’s blog, about caring for your grandson, very moving, Hutt. It is a labour of love. I hope you in turn receive support and care, for this is not a small or light thing to do. Hugs.

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      3. There was nobody else to look after him. We have come close to the end of the oad – he is 21 yrs in a few weeks and will need a little more independence. He will be a candidate for supported reidential living – a place with 4-6 young fellows supported by a live-in supervisor who looks after their cooking, meds, and general day to day living, and supervises outside activities. Its all part of encouraging independence. In a year or two.

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  4. What a fab house to visit, even if you couldn’t get inside. The weather today was beautiful for a day out in the sun.

    Glad your getting the hang of these 40 winks in the afternoon, it does wonders.

    Take care šŸ™‚ x

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  5. Wow I love the rock houses too – just been rootling about on the internewt looking at lots of pics of them inside and the one that is all how it would have been when lived in… and I want to live there too! We could start a colony and call it Blog End or something šŸ˜‰ where the Blog-trogs live šŸ˜³ with Trog-dogs and so on šŸ˜‰

    Sounds wonderful that they were cool in the summer and warm in the winter! Perfect! Sounds a wonderful day apart from the disappointing pub-grub… what a shame….:(

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    1. What a great idea … we could start a community … and hack a chamber out of the rocks to be our chapel … and follow up on St Austin (who was a hermit here, way back) – maybe he even had a well!! I have a friend in Wales who has discovered a local saint and his well, and she’s had her foot healed in the water. 8| amazing!

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      1. Wow, how wonderful! šŸ˜€

        Yes we could indeed hack a chapel out of the rock – that would be sooooooooooooo wonderful! šŸ™‚ I can just imagine it….. :b We could swish about in proper robey things… and be hermity…… sort of….ish……

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      2. yes … provided I could have central heating … and hot and cold running water … and a proper shower … and a washing machine … and a proper cooker … and not have to grow EVERYthing … and …

        … come to think of it, maybe I wouldn’t make such a good hermit after all šŸ˜‰

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      3. :)) I think good people come and leave nice food for us so we can industriously pray and things…. and the caves were warm in the winter and cool in the summer weren’t they? šŸ™‚ Keep a few hens for egglets…. and have a nice fire in the parlour just because it is a nice thing to have…..

        I’d be quite happy playing at making rugs and WEAVING things and so on – life would be one big arts and crafts session :))

        Somebody else would do the tricky stuff with washing and so on šŸ˜‰ (I’m just a dreamer…..)

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      4. I think we had better have people coming and leaving us food … becoz what with you doing your weaving and sculpting and painting and dreaming and praying and me writing and wandering over the hills and pondering and praying … between us we would probably starve to death!! :))

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      5. :)) very true…. but if some kindly soul will leave us a sack of swedes and a machete I’ll be more than happy to dispatch them swiftly and with Great Aplomb (an old wise Injun I happen to know šŸ˜‰ ) or even carrots to chop… I’ll be happy to oblige…. I’m developing a System 8|

        We could send messages via pigeons :b oh it’s going to be such fun! šŸ™‚

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      6. Well, if we are going to live amongst Injuns, maybe we should sleep in the rockhouses for warmth … but have tepees outside for when we are Being Creative … and praps we might have smoke signals as well as carrier pigeons … hmmm šŸ™„

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      7. Sounds good to me! The smoke signals game will be excellent fun I reckon though I have a feeling we end up with blackened faces…..:) If we trained the pigeons to smoke they could kill two birds with one stone as of do the smoke signals as they flew?

        I’ll get my coat….. šŸ˜‰

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  6. That house is simply gorgeous!!!! What a lovely day….well apart from the chewy food!!!

    It’s awful when one’s boss pops in unexpectedly….lol…at least you were prepared!!!

    I think I’ll take to the sofa and doze off….it’s bitterly cold here tonight!!!xxxx

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      1. We couldn’t look inside the house that’s been reproduced as it was early last century – only in the summer! But we met a group of National Trust volunteers who kindly let us have 5 minutes in what was left of some of them, before locking the gate after us. Amazing! I shall come and visit you, Roy šŸ˜‰

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    1. They are very small inside, but the NT have found a photograph taken when people actually lived there, so they’ve been able to reproduce one of the houses exactly! Unfortunately, not open this time of year :no:

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